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Scanning Film Negatives with a DSLR by Amy Berge

Scanning Film Negatives with a DSLR on Shoot It With Film

I am fortunate enough that I have a Noritsu LS-600 (read: super swanky scanner) for my 35mm film. It can take in and scan an entire roll at once, is extremely fast, gives me great results, and has saved me a ton of money over the years. It only has two flaws: It doesn’t scan sprocket holes, and it doesn’t scan 120 film…

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Developing Color Film in Black and White Chemicals by Jennifer Stamps

Develop Color Film in Black and White Chemicals by Jennifer Stamps on Shoot It With Film

What happens when you develop color (C41) film in black and white chemicals? Technically it’s called cross-processing. But usually cross-processing refers to C41 film developed in E6 chemicals (or vice versa). I wanted to find out what would happen to color film if it was developed in black and white chemicals. Why? Because, why not?

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Your Self-Developing Questions Answered! by Amy Berge

Self-Developing Questions Answered by Amy Berge on Shoot It With Film

When I started self-developing my film I had so many questions, not just about the development process (which you can read about here for b&w film and here for color film), but also about the logistics involved. Can I reuse chemicals? For how long? How do I dispose of them? How should I store them?

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Develop Color Film At Home by Amy Berge

How To Develop C-41 Color Film At Home by Amy Berge on Shoot It With FIlm

YOU DO NOT NEED A DARK ROOM TO DO THIS. You don’t even need a lot of space. You just need a sink and a changing bag. Once you get your film in the tank in your changing bag, it is light tight and can be worked with in daylight. The investment to do this is relatively minimal, will pay for itself before you know it, and the developing process is so much easier than you might think. So please read this article with the idea that you, too, can develop your own film at home!