Fujifilm GF670 Review: Is This Compact Medium Format Film Camera Right For You?

The Fujifilm GF670 - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
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If you’re looking for a compact, high-quality medium format camera, the Fujifilm GF670 is such a great option.

I picked it up a few years ago, and it has become my go-to camera whenever I want to shoot medium format. It’s a fantastic travel camera, easy to use, and produces stunning images.

The Fujifilm GF670 - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
The Fujifilm GF670

An Overview of the Fujifilm GF670

Fujifilm’s GF670, also known as the Voigtländer Bessa III, is a folding rangefinder that shoots in either 6×6 or 6×7 format.

It’s similar in style to Fujifilm’s GA645 line of cameras, but with a folding bellows system for the lens.

If you want some more information on rangefinders and how to use them, you can learn about that here.

So let’s dive into a few of the pros and cons of the Fuji GF670 and the technical details.

Find the Fujifilm GF670 on eBay.

Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 160
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Reasons to Love the Fujifilm GF670

1. It’s Compact!

It’s tough to find a medium format camera in a small package, especially one that shoots 6×7.

Other popular 67 cameras like the Pentax 67 or the Mamiya RB67 are known for their bulkiness and how heavy they are to carry around, but the GF670 is exactly the opposite.

When the camera is open and your shooting, it’s only 7″ x 4.3″ x 5.4″ and about 2 lbs. Compare that to the Mamiya RB67 which is almost 6 pounds!

And it folds down to about 2.5” thick, so it’s really easy to travel with and pack away in a camera bag.

The Fujifilm GF670 - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
The GF670 when folded.
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Ilford HP5

2. Beautiful Build Quality and Shooting Experience

The Fuji GF670 is a gorgeous camera. It has a modern, sleek design with a super durable feel. I’ve shot this camera for a few years now, and the bellows still look brand new. Just really well made and a beautiful piece of machinery.

It’s also very mechanical. There is no LCD screen or digital settings. Setting the aperture, focus, and shutter speed are all done with knobs and dials. So if you like a very classic, mechanical film experience, this camera is it.

The GF670 was in production from about 2009 to 2014, and many of the newer film cameras like this feel like digital cameras that just take film (like the Nikon F6).

But not the GF670. Because it is so mechanical and keeps that folded bellows design, the shooting experience is unmistakably film in the absolutely best way.

Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 160
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 160

3. The Lens is Sharp

The GF670 has a fixed Fujinon EBS 80mm f/3.5 lens, and it is a dang good lens. I have found it to be very sharp, even at f/3.5, and just a beautiful lens that really makes your images shine.

Note: There is also a wide version of this camera, the GF670W, with a fixed 55mm lens. The wide version does not fold and does not have bellows. Instead, the lens is bolted to the front of the camera.

Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Ilford HP5

4. It’s So Quiet!

When I say the GF670 is quiet, I mean QUIET! Like the shutter is almost completely silent and it’s hard to tell if I took a picture quiet.

So if you’re looking for something that won’t draw a lot of attention and is a good fit for street photography and similar types of shooting, this camera might be a good fit.

5. Excellent Internal Light Meter

I have found the internal light meter on the GF670 to be really reliable and consistent. I set this camera to aperture priority and let it do its thing. I don’t even carry an external meter with me anymore when I’m using the GF670.

Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 160
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 160

Least Favorite Things About the GF670

As much as I love this camera, there are a few things I’m not too crazy about.

1. Rangefinder Misalignment Issues

Vertical misalignment with the rangefinder is a fairly common problem with the GF670. It can happen when the camera gets knocked around a lot, such as when it’s shipped.

So what is a vertical misalignment with the rangefinder? This means that when you are looking through the viewfinder and focusing the camera, instead of the two images in your viewfinder lining up, they will be stacked on top of each other.

Rangefinder vertical misalignment - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Here is what a vertical misalignment in your rangefinder looks like. When you look through the viewfinder, your lens is actually in focus but instead of the two images overlapping, one is on top of the other.

I had this issue with my camera, and, honestly, I used it misaligned for over a year. I would use a straight line in my scene, like a tree trunk or edge of a building, and use that to focus. Not ideal, but gets the job done.

But you can fix it! You have to be comfortable opening up your camera a bit, but the fix was pretty straight forward, and I was able to fix it myself without having to send it away to be repaired.

There are a few screws located under the hot shoe that are used to adjust the rangefinder. So you will need to pry off the hot shoe cover, unscrew the four screws that keep the hot shoe in place, and then you’ll be able to see two screws. Rotate the large one to adjust the vertical rangefinder alignment.

Here’s a good breakdown of the process, and feel free to reach out if you have any questions.

The Fujifilm GF670 - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
The adjustments for the rangefinder are located under the hot shoe.
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400

2. The Battery Drains When Not in Use

The battery on the Fuji GF670 is known to drain when the camera is not in use. So if the camera sits for a bit, you might have a dead battery the next time you pick it up.

And this camera does need a battery to function. It will not work without one.

I combat this by taking the battery out when I’m not shooting. It’s a pain, but a workaround I’m okay with.

Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Ilford HP5
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400

3. Max Shutter Speed of 1/500th

A max shutter speed of 1/500th of a second is common in film cameras, but I really wish this camera had a higher max shutter speed.

When I’m shooting on a sunny day, I am often cranking my aperture up to f/8 or f/11. If you’re trying to isolate your subject, having an extra stop or two of shutter speed to work with some lower apertures would be nice.

Of course, you can use some neutral density filters and slower films to get around this. I have this filter set when I want to gain a few stops.

A note about filters, the GF670 will not fold closed when a filter is attached. To fold the camera, it needs to be focused to infinity and nothing can be attached to the lens.

Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 160
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 160
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400

4. No Multiple Exposure Feature

This is definitely a personal preference, but I love to shoot double exposures, and the lack of a multiple exposure setting is a pretty big downside for me.

I have not figured out a hack for this yet, but I have heard occasionally you’ll get a random double on the last of the roll.

5. The Price

The price of the GF670 has been going up for the last couple of years, and is now at around $3000. I was lucky to pick mine up a few years ago and found an unused copy in the box for around $2000, but still, this is an expensive film camera. No way around it.

For me, the investment has been worth it. I love using this camera, I love the quality, and it’s become my main medium format camera, but the price can be a big barrier if you want to try it out.

Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Ilford HP5

Technical Details for the Fujifilm GF670

Production Years: 2009 – 2014

Format: Shoots 6×6 or 6×7

ISO Range: 25 – 3200 in 1/3 stops

F Stop Range: f3.5 – f22 in half stops

Shutter Speed Range: 4 seconds – 1/500th of a second and bulb mode – If the aperture is faster than f4, the max shutter speed available is 1/250th of a second.

Focusing Range: 0.9m – infinity

Lens: Fixed Fujinon EBS 80mm f3/5 lens

Battery: 1 CR2 Lithium Battery – The GF670 does need the battery to function. It will not work without it.

Lens Filter Size: 58mm

Size: 7″ x 4.3″ x 5.4″ open or 7″ x 4.3″ x 2.5″ when folded

Weight: 2.2lbs

Flash: No integrated flash, but you can attach an external flash through the hot shoe or flash port.

Tripod Mount: Yes

External Shutter Release: Screw threads for a cable shutter release

If you want to check out the manual for the GF670, you can find it here.

Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 160
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400
Medium format film image of a landscape - Fujifilm GF670 Review on Shoot It With Film
Fujifilm GF670 with Kodak Portra 400

Final Thoughts on the Fuji GF670

The Fujifilm GF670 is a beautifully made film camera. The shooting experience is top notch, and it does such a wonderful job at blending a modern machine with a classic analog experience.

And you can shoot 67 negatives! A high quality 67 camera in a compact package is so unique and will really make you fall in love with GF670.

Let us know your thoughts or any questions you have about the Fujifilm GF670 below in the comments, and you can pick one up for yourself on eBay.

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Kathleen Frank

Kathleen Frank is the founder of Shoot It With Film. Find her other articles here, such as 5 35mm Film Cameras for Beginners and 5 Best Point and Shoot Film Cameras.

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