4 Film Cases Worth Checking Out!

Evergreen Film Case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film
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Organizing film is not a skill of mine. I have rolls of 35mm and 120 thrown in the bottom of my camera bag and stashed in random drawers throughout my house.

If you’re like me, a film case might be exactly what you need.

Film cases are containers specifically designed to store and carry 35mm and 120 rolls of film. They are a great option for organizing your film rolls, and they also make a wonderful gift for any film photographer in your life.

Let’s take a look at a few of the film cases out there.

Evergreen Protective Film Cases

If you are looking for durable and rugged, Evergreen cases are an awesome choice. They are the most protective on this list and designed to be waterproof and crushproof.

They are also made so you can store them in the refrigerator. No more Ziplock bags full of film in the fridge!

The Evergreen Seahorse X case is one of the largest film cases I’ve been able to find. Most cases hold five, sometimes ten, rolls of film, but the large version of the Seahorse X has a removable insert that holds 18 rolls of 35mm. (They are working on a film insert for 120 film that should be out soon.)

The smaller case holds 7 rolls of 35mm or 5 rolls of 120 but does not have any kind of insert holding the film in place.

Prices are around $20 for the small case and $45 for the large case.

Find Evergreen Film Cases on Amazon.

Evergreen Film Case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film
Evergreen Film Case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film
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Reformed Film Lab Leather Film Cases

If rugged isn’t your thing, try the leather film cases at Reformed Film Lab.

These are beautiful cases that come in brown or black leather with a clean and minimal design.

They have five roll or single roll case options available for both 35mm and 120. The cases storing five rolls of film have leather (non-removable) loops inside the case to hold your film in place.

The single roll case comes with a keychain so you can hook it to your camera strap or bag. Great if you just want to make sure you have an extra roll of film on you! This style also has a beautiful dark green option.

The single roll case is around $12, and five roll case is around $40.

Find Reformed Film Lab Leather Film Cases at reformedfilmlab.com.

Reformed Film Lab case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film
Image credit: @reformedfilmlab
Reformed Film Lab case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film
Image credit: @reformedfilmlab

Kodak Retro Film Cases

And for an awesome retro look, you can’t go wrong with the Kodak film cases.

These metal film cases are painted in bright vintage Kodak colors like yellow, red, and blue (as well as a few neutral options).

The small case holds five rolls of 35mm film, and the larger case holds ten rolls of 35mm or eight rolls of 120. They all have removable plastic inserts to hold the film in place, and with the larger case, you can also easily mix rolls of 35mm and 120.

Take the inserts out, and the case turns into a great little multi-functional tin! Perfect for storing pens or office supplies.

The metal is also a nice touch, making these cases feel quite solid. The metal gives them an extra bit of durability so they won’t get dinged or scratched easily, and the lid also snaps securely into place so it won’t pop off in your camera bag.

You can get the smaller cases for around $25 and the larger ones for around $30.

Find Kodak Film Cases on Amazon.

Kodak Film Case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film
Kodak Film Case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film

Japan Camera Hunter Film Cases

At under $16, the film cases from Japan Camera Hunter have a simple and functional design at a great price point.

With separate cases for 35mm and 120, they have 35mm cases for five or ten rolls of film and 120 cases that hold five rolls of film.

These are made of hard molded plastic, with a shape that holds the film rolls in place without the need for inserts. They also come in a variety of fun colors: red, pink, green, black, and white.

The lid does not lock into place, so if you go for this film case, make sure the lid fits snuggly so it doesn’t accidently open in your camera bag.

The five roll 35mm case is around $14, and ten roll 35mm case and five roll 120 case is around $16.

Find Japan Camera Hunter Film Cases at B&H Photo.

Japan Camera Hunter Film Case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film
Image credit: @japancamerahunter
Japan Camera Hunter Film Case - Film Cases Worth Trying on Shoot It With Film
Image credit: @japancamerahunter

Let us know any questions you have about these film cases below in the comments, and we’d also love to hear your favorite way to protect and organize your film!

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Kathleen Frank

Kathleen Frank is the founder of Shoot It With Film. Find her other articles here, such as 5 35mm Film Cameras for Beginners and 5 Best Point and Shoot Film Cameras.

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Blog Comments

Nice cases, but for 35mm film, I still prefer 35mm film cans taped upside down on my camera strap! It’s cheap – the cans are free, and how much does a few inches of electrician’s tape cost? – ans convenient – pop the lid and the film drops into your hand. The only drawback is if you want to give it as a gift! 😉

–Rich

That is such a great idea, Rich! I am totally going to try it. Thank you for sharing!

I shoot with 120 film and 35mm and have two ETone plastic film cases (Amazon). Both are labeled – one to hold unexposed rolls and the other for exposed. Holds both 120 and also 35mm if I wanted to switch.

Great recommendation! I’ll have to check out the ETone cases!

Nice collection! I regularly buy film from Silbersalz35 in Germany. When you buy 4 rolls the come in a nice case you can use forever. I store my film in the freezer in these cases. The sell the cases alone for €10

Their cases look awesome! Thank you so much for sharing!

Do you have any recommendations for cases that protect against x-rays during airline travel?

Hi Kristen! When flying with film, the best thing to do is to keep the film in your carry-on and ask for it to be hand checked through security to keep it from going through the x-ray machine. You can also use an x-ray bag designed for film (such as the Domke 711-15B Large Filmguard Bag), but these make it so the x-ray machines cannot see inside the bag at all. TSA may need to empty your luggage to check what is in the bag. Hope this helps!

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