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Scanning Film Negatives with a DSLR by Amy Berge

Scanning Film Negatives with a DSLR on Shoot It With Film

I am fortunate enough that I have a Noritsu LS-600 (read: super swanky scanner) for my 35mm film. It can take in and scan an entire roll at once, is extremely fast, gives me great results, and has saved me a ton of money over the years. It only has two flaws: It doesn’t scan sprocket holes, and it doesn’t scan 120 film…

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Diana Mini Camera Review by Amy Berge

Diana Mini 35mm Film Camera Review by Amy Berge on Shoot It With Film

I shoot film exclusively, so you already know I’m a glutton for punishment. But add in my love for the Diana Mini, an overpriced 35mm plastic camera that breaks a little too often, and you know I’m really crazy. But I truly do love it, and I’d love for you to fall in love with it, too…

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Hack Your DX Code! by Amy Berge

DX Code Hacking for 35mm Film Photography on Shoot It With Film

I am the proud owner of two point and shoot film cameras, an Olympus Stylus Epic (also known as the Mju II in Europe) and the Yashica T4 Super. The Yashica T4 Super was a hand-me-down from my father-in-law, and I still can’t believe my luck that he happened to have this sweet camera in his stash (and that he gifted it to me!).

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Your Self-Developing Questions Answered! by Amy Berge

Self-Developing Questions Answered by Amy Berge on Shoot It With Film

When I started self-developing my film I had so many questions, not just about the development process (which you can read about here for b&w film and here for color film), but also about the logistics involved. Can I reuse chemicals? For how long? How do I dispose of them? How should I store them?

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How to Create Light Leaks on Film by Amy Berge

How to Shoot Light Leaks on Film by Amy Berge on Shoot It With Film

I love light leaks so much that they’ve become a regular part of my work, both for personal work and for paid clients. Similar to grain, light leaks add depth, dimension, and layers to the film. The emotion of an image is ramped up every time light leaks are added. If you want to add light leaks to your film work but have no idea where to start, I’m here to help!